Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Worship Design’ Category

Bob Kauflin offers some good suggestions for worship songs on Easter Sunday (April 4)…

Happy Day – Tim Hughes
Uptempo celebration of Christ’s victory over the grave.
The greatest day in history
Death is beaten, you have rescued me
Sing it out, Jesus is alive

His Name is Jesus – Judah Groveman
All Hail the Power with a new chorus.
His name is Jesus, risen Lamb for sinners slain.

A Tomb So Cold – Joel Payne
Uptempo, two verses and bridge.
A tomb so cold, no fitting place
for one whom death could never hold.
You broke the chains, defeated sin,
and glorified you rose again, and you’re reigning

Resurrection Day – Matt Maher
Uptempo song of celebration.
It’s the power in your blood, breaks away sin’s embrace
And we celebrate our freedom dancing on our broken chains

Glorious – Paul Baloche
Mid-tempo song that celebrates the glory of the risen Christ.
Look inside the mystery see the empty cross
See the risen Savior victorious and strong

We Believe – Sam Hargreaves
Uptempo, three verses that explore the suffering Savior, living Savior, and coming Savior.
Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again.

You Alone Can Rescue – Matt Redman

Mid-tempo song that emphasizes our inability to save ourselves.
You alone can rescue, You alone can save
You alone can lift us from the grave

Saving One – Starfield
Eminently singable song that proclaims the effects of Christ’s resurrection in our lives.
His love has made a way, the grave is overcome
Jesus is the Christ, the saving One

Christ is Risen – Jeremy Riddle
Anthemic song that celebrates Christ’s victory over the grave. May be better as a special.
Quickly now go tell the world Christ, the Lord, He is risen
The power of death could never hold Him in the grave

Come, Christians Join to Sing – Alt. lyrics vs. 3 and 4 Kevin Hartnett
A great hymn made even better by the lyrical additions of my friend, Kevin Hartnett.
Come, praise the risen Lamb, Alleluia! Amen!
He died to ransom man, Alleluia! Amen!

See What a Morning – Keith Getty and Stuart Townend
12/8 triumphant hymn filled with passionate theology.
See God’s salvation plan wrought in love, borne in pain, paid in sacrifice,
Fulfilled in Christ, the Man, for He lives: Christ is risen from the dead!

The Power of the Cross – Keith Getty and Stuart Townend
Destined-to-be-a-classic modern hymn that focuses on the meaning of Christ’s sufferings.
Curtain torn in two, dead are raised to life
“Finished!” the victory cry

The Risen Christ – Keith Getty and Phil Madeira
Hymn-like prayer, asking the triune God to help us know the Risen Christ.
O breath of God, come fill this place
Revive our hearts to know your grace;
And from our slumber make us rise
That we may know the risen Christ.

My Redeemer Lives – Samuel Medley
Some additional lyrics to this hymn on the Cyberhymnal site.
He lives to silence all my fears, He lives to wipe away my tears
He lives to calm my troubled heart, He lives all blessings to impart.

I Will Rise – Chris Tomlin
Chris personalizes the impact of the resurrection and ties it to Christ’s return.
I will rise when he calls my name, no more sorrow, no more pain.

Redeemer – Nicole Mullen
A great special, especially if you have a soulful vocalist and choir who can “bring it.”
The same gentle hands that hold me when I’m broken
They conquered death to bring me victory

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

@SarcasticLuther (Nadia Bolz-Weber) tweeted:

every week I look at the texts for Sunday and think “sh*t. i have absolutely nothing to say about this. i’ve had a good run but it’s over”

I love it. Refreshingly truthful. While it might seem like having nothing to say about a Scripture text is a bad thing, it actually is very good. At the end of human understanding and wisdom, the knowledge of the Lord and the movement of the Spirit step in. Having nothing to say can allow the space for God to say what needs to be said.

I think this is something worship musicians struggle with a lot also. Every week we are faced with the equal task of ordering and supporting an environment that best supports the Word of God and the work of the Spirit. Even selecting songs can feel uninspiring and impossibly cliche. How do you consistently find ways to gather people together in a spirit of confession, adoration, praise, and humility – every 7 days. Once again, this is a good place to let go and let the Spirit do the leading.

Read Full Post »

ReformationReformation Day is October 25. Here is an order of worship from Reformed Worship that contains a lot of Reformation-era texts:

This order of service was prepared for Reformation Sunday 2003 at First Presbyterian Church, Royal Oak, Michigan. It includes several liturgical elements from the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century, including contributions from Luther in Germany, Bucer in Strassbourg, Calvin in Geneva, Zwingli in Zurich, Knox in Scotland, and from the English Reformation. The songs include a psalm, canticle, and hymns from these traditions; they can be found in the Presbyterian Hymnal as well as in many other hymnals.

Read Full Post »

Mistake # 2: Putting a long section of announcements at the beginning of the worship service.  It’s like tuning into the beginning of a sitcom only to find all of the commercials loaded up front before anything else happens. Instead, begin worship with a rousing piece of music that says “Something great is going to happen here today.” If you have to do announcements, don’t lead off with them. Please.

Read the top 6 tactical mistakes that churches make by Bill Easum.

Read Full Post »

This weekend I taught a workshop for the Fall Leadership Summit of the TX-LA Gulf Coast Synod of the ELCA. The session was titled “Worship – All Things Alternative.”

Here is a brief overview of what I talked about:

  1. Definition of worship
  2. Attempt to define differences between worship styles
  3. Problems with trying to define worship styles
  4. Questions for reflection
  5. The alternative perspective of Convergent Worship
  6. Some alternative elements to use in worship
  7. Resources

Dowload the handout-notes here: “Worship – All Things Alternative”

Read Full Post »

Don Saliers (in Music in Christian Worship) presented the idea of three levels of participation in worship. The first level of participation is the actual doing of the liturgy (singing, praying, reading, etc.). The second level of participation is the same actions of the first level, but doing them as the church. This level implies that worshipers are performing the functions of the liturgy not for their own fulfillment, but looking to the interests and preferences of others. Worship is done in community with those in the local Body of Christ, with the Body of Christ through the ages past and yet to come, and with the Body of Christ that is marginalized. Finally, the third level of participation in worship includes entering into the mystical communion of the Triune God. Here our lives join the divine life of the three-in-one God.

Most pastoral musicians spend the majority of their time and energy at the first level: the design and logistics of actually doing the liturgy. The second level is where I struggle. How do you nicely communicate to someone (or everyone) they are being selfish and narcissistic in worship, and not lose your job? How do you model worship that places the preferences of others over the preferences of self? We are lucky to observe glimpses of the third level. Often times joining our lives with the dance of the Trinity sounds like something only possible in the world to come. Perhaps it is also helpful to think of these levels of worship participation in reverse. Consider that every believer has unity and communion with the Trinity that is established through a saving relationship with Jesus Christ. Because we each have unity with God, in Jesus, we can share unity and communion with each other as brothers and sisters, fellow heirs of Christ’s kingdom. Finally, it is out of our unity with God and communion with each other (saints gone-by, yet to come, and forgotten) that the liturgy finds its voice and actions. The first level of actually doing the liturgy should only be approached in the knowledge that our faith is a gift of grace, and that faith is to be lived out in community.

Read Full Post »

From Jordan at Northwood Church

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »